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Ngurrara 2-Way Learning Cultural Camp

May 12, 2016

A special event was held in Kurlku recently, a three-hour drive south of Fitzroy Crossing in the Great Sandy Desert. The Ngurrara 2-Way Learning Cultural Camp, organised by Yanunijarra Aboriginal Corporation, was a celebration of the work of the Ngurrara Rangers and the Shell 2-Way Learning Project, a water monitoring project sponsored by Shell Australia.

Ngurrara men and woman rangers assisted in hosting a three-day cultural camp, strengthening the bond between youth and elders and fostering the two-way learning of traditional knowledge.

The Ngurrara 2-Way Learning Cultural Camp, organised by Yanunijarra Aboriginal Corporation was held during 3-6 May 2016 at Kurlku in the remote Great Sandy Desert.

Over one hundred men, women and children gathered at Kurlku to celebrate the work of the Ngurrara rangers and the Shell 2-Way Learning Project, a water monitoring project sponsored by Shell Australia.

Ngurrara Women Ranger Coordinator Chantelle Murray said the camp gave young people the unique opportunity to work with and learn from Traditional Owners on country.

“The camp was really about allowing the kids to work within two worlds, and encourage an understanding of both Western science and traditional knowledge. It was a highly successful camp, and we had great participation from our rangers, schools, Traditional Owners and various partners.”

“Young people don’t always get the opportunity to go out on country and have one-on-one with elders due to lack of transport and other issues. The camp played an important role in connecting young people to Traditional Owners on country.”

Young people from local high schools including Fitzroy District High School, Yakanarra Community School, Djugerari Community School and Wulungurra Remote Community School had the opportunity to meet with elders to hear traditional stories and participate in activities including sandal-making, painting, boomerang and spear making, health, media and traditional hair-dying workshops.

Mr Peter Murray, CEO of Yanunijarra Aboriginal Corporation says he noticed a difference in the young people attending the camp. He says he was pleased that the students remained connected and motivated throughout the activities being provided on their traditional lands.

The camp was made possible because of Shell Australia and the support from partners including Ngurrara Rangers,  Ngurrara Canvas committee, KRED, Kimberley Land Council, Mangkaja Arts, Yiriman Project, Garnduwa, Nindilingarri Cultural Health and participating schools.

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